Christine and Carole Alumni Day

Christine and Carol Share Their Story

“It was like a dream come true to go to Moorelands Camp and escape from the traffic noise, pollution and congestion…”

Christine and Carol's Moorelands Story

Christine and Carole at Alumni Day
Christine and Carole at Alumni Day

At Alumni Day 2017 (July 15th) we got the chance to catch up with two campers from the 1960s, sisters Christine and Carol. Here, Christine tells their story:

“Moorelands Camp at Beaverton first came to our attention through Constance Hood who of St. Stephen’s-in-the-Fields Anglican Church, and through her, we joined this church shortly after moving to Toronto.  She also happened to be one of the directors of the DCA and a well-known leader at the camp.  I attended the girls’ camp for 5 years in the early ‘60s and my sister, Carol, attended for 3 years starting in the late ‘50s.

Moorelands Camp at Beaverton

“We have great memories of Moorelands Camp which was situated on a very picturesque area of land overlooking Lake Simcoe. There was a fair bit of lawn all through the camp, so it was not a rustic setting by any means.  The three long dormitories for the campers were named:  Sunset (the yellow one), Lakeview (green), and Woodlands (brown), and there was also this lovely quaint chapel at the far end of camp that had this lovely pine smell as you entered.

Bishop Hunt, Constance Hood & Beatrice Thorne circa 1962
Bishop Hunt, Constance Hood & Beatrice Thorne circa 1962
Carol in 1961
Carol in 1961

Memories to Last a Lifetime

“The swim lessons were invaluable in helping to overcome my fear of water.  My first year, the biggest thrill was being awarded a copper cup for most improved swimmer.  Carol’s most memorable highlight was winning the reward for having the neatest dorm.  She was so motivated to win that she and her roommate ended up cleaning some of the other campers’ rooms!  In the end, it was worth all their hard work.

“Meal times were fun. We sang and clapped to the “gilly gilly wash wash” song, with each table shouting out the names of various tribes assigned to us.  The food was excellent and nourishing. As there was no automatic dishwasher back then, an adult volunteer washed the dishes and the campers took turns in groups, drying them – a somewhat daunting task – but there was also a sense of accomplishment and relief when we finished.

Looking Back at How Camp Was

“Nightly entertainment in the rec hall for skits, songs, and games was so enjoyable.  The variety of crafts, the tuck shop, mail time, and the long walk to the town of Beaverton also stand out.  Then there were the flag raising/lowering ceremonies.  Each morning three campers were assigned to hoist the flag up the pole and each evening three more would lower it.  We always felt a bit nervous hoping we wouldn`t mess up!

“The evening campfire was something we all looked forward to.  They always started out with “Fire’s Burning” and ended with “Day is Done”. Although there was no archery, kayaking or canoeing, there was plenty to keep us busy.

“After Moorelands, I attended Camp High Adventure on Sparrow Lake for two years. We both started full-time work right after high school as money was tight back then.  Apart from raising our own families, Carol has been, and is still, heavily involved with her Anglican Church for the past 40 years, lending her time and support where needed.  I went back to college 15 years ago, completing a legal diploma program, while also doing volunteer work at a retirement home.

Christine in Toronto, 1966
Christine in Toronto, 1966
Christine at Camp in 1966
Christine at Camp in 1966
Christine and Carol relive memories at alumni day
Christine and Carol relive memories at alumni day

The Importance of Giving Back

“Moorelands taught us early on about giving back to the community in the same way we were helped.  We are grateful to Mrs. Hood and the DCA to have given us this opportunity as we lived in one of the busiest streets in downtown Toronto, and right across from a busy car wash at that, so it was like a dream come true to escape from the traffic noise, pollution and congestion!”

Share YOUR Story Too!

We love reading the stories of those who have been to Moorelands – either as participants or staff. Alumni, why not share your own Moorelands story too?

Don’t forget to sign up to join our Alumni Group to keep up to date with alumni news and events and opportunities to get involved with Moorelands.

History of Moorelands Camp

History of Moorelands Camp: 100 Years

Moorelands Camp is 100 years old in 2017! Learn about our camp’s history in a timeline of key moments: Moorelands Camp – 100 years of meeting needs & inspiring change.

Our impact in numbers:

  • We’ve helped over 129,500 children.
  • We’ve supported 89,300 families.
  • We’ve made more than 13,200 boat trips to ferry campers to our island on Kawagama Lake.
  • We’ve lit and enjoyed 8,400 camp fires under milky way skies.
  • We’ve roasted over 360,000 marshmallows.
  • Campers have enjoyed over 29 million hours of bonding with positive, caring role models.
timeline_pre_loader
MOORELANDS WAS ESTABLISHED IN 1912

1912: FOUNDER CANON R.J. MOORE

Moorelands began in 1912 as the Downtown Church workers Association (DCA) to help with the difficult living conditions of the time

1912: ORIGINAL MISSION STATEMENT

To minister to the souls and bodies of the people in district south of College St. (over 7,000 home visits made in the first year)

1917: DCA TURNED CORPORATION

letter patent

DCA incorporated as a corporation without share capital in the Province of Ontario

1917: LAKE SIMCOE

5 acres on Lake Simcoe purchased for Moorelands Camp (would grow eventually to 18 acres)

1917: ST.FAITH'S LODGE

St. Faith’s Lodge for underprivileged girls opens

1917: MOORELANDS CAMP

Moorelands Camp opens – 500 children and mothers attend in parties of 100 for 12 days

1920: RECESSION

1917 TORONTO

Recession results in sharp rise in unemployment & high demand on DCA

1926: CANON R.J. MOORE DIES

Founder of the Downtown Church workers Association Canon Moore dies

1931: DCA COMBATS THE AFFECTS OF THE DEPRESSION

DCA responds to the needs of those affected by the Depression with food, clothing & shelter

1940: ST.FAITH'S LODGE TURNED OVER

St. Faith’s Lodge given over to United Appeal

1952: MOORELANDS CAMP RUNDOWN

After being neglected for 20 years, Moorelands Camp infrastructure near dilapidation

1953 - 1955: REBUILD OF CAMP

Massive rebuild of Moorelands Camp leaves little money left for urban programs

1957: URBAN BOARD

Urban Board formed

1963: DOWNTOWN CHURCHES JOIN DCA

12 downtown churches now part of DCA

1964: DCA SWITCHES GEARS

DCA moves from parochial “hand-out” organization to inter-denominational work in the community

1971: DCA FACED FINANCIAL TROUBLE

Financial troubles & changing city lead to full scale reorganization of DCA

MOORELANDS PURCHASED CAMP KAWAGAMA IN 1972

1980: SPECIAL COMMITTEE CREATED

Special Committee on urban work created to deal with causes of suffering rather than just the effects

1982: MOTHERS' PROGRAM DISCONTINUED AT CAMP

Last summer the mothers’ program is offered at camp

1987: ASSOCIATES DISBAND

The final step in the transition to a professional staff model at DCA

1992: BOARD REDUCED

Board reduced from 27 to 15 members and focus shifts to policy

1994: NEW MISSION STATEMENT

DCA works with economically disadvantaged children and youth from Toronto

1995: DCA CAMP ORGANIZATION

DCA considers itself a camp organization with supportive programs during the year

1996: MOORELANDS CAMP MAINTENANCE

Moorelands Camp Capital Maintenance Plan created

2000-2008: CAMP RESEARCH CONDUCTED

Research studies conducted at Moorelands Camp with professors from U of T

DCA CHANGED IT'S NAME TO MOORELANDS COMMUNITY SERVICES IN 2001

2002: NEW CITY PROGRAMS MODEL

History

 4 C’s & Positive Youth Development introduced

2003: CITY PROGRAMS EXPANSION

City Programs Expansion Plan approved

2004: ACHIEVED FUNDRAISING GOALS

History

Capital fundraising goal of $1.5M achieved to rebuild Moorelands Camp

2005: SERVES MORE THAN 1,500 IN PROGRAMS

History

Moorelands serves more than 1,500 children & youth in city, camp & family programs

2007: ALL CITY PROGRAMS MOVED LOCATIONS

2007 All City Programs moved to Flemingdon/Thorncliffe Park

2008: EVIDENCE-BASED PROGRAMMING

Research informs all program design

2010 REVISED MANDATE

History

Revised mandate includes building competence, confidence, character & connections

2011: REBUILD COMPLETE

history

The rebuild of Moorelands Camp is complete

2012: MOORELANDS CELEBRATES 100 YEARS

Moorelands celebrates its 100th Anniversary

2014: CAMP CHANGES TO A CALENDAR WEEK

history

Moorelands Camp changes to a calendar week

2014: DAY CAMP PILOT

History

Moorelands pilots Kawagama Day Camp

2016: LEADERSHIP HABITS AND QUALITIES INTRODUCED

History

Moorelands leadership habits and qualities are introduced to align camp and After-school programs

MOORELANDS CAMP CELEBRATES IT'S 100th BIRTHDAY IN 2017

See how we will be celebrating Moorelands Camp’s 100th birthday and Canada’s 150’s birthday up at camp this summer with our Canada 150 Heritage and Hope Timeline.

Moorelands is a proud recipient of a Canada 150 Grant for our “Heritage and Hope Timeline” at Moorelands Camp this summer. This initiative is made possible by the Community Fund for Canada’s 150th, a collaboration between Toronto Foundation, the Government of Canada, and extraordinary leaders from coast to coast to coast.

Moorelands: Canada 150 Grant
Martha Eisenhoffer

Martha Eisenhoffer

Century Club Member – Martha Eisenhoffer

Martha Einsenhoffer (c) with Moorelands' Staff Maureen Lewis (l) and Cheryle Pollock (r)

“I can’t help but love Moorelands Baby Bundles….  This is a great way to help that has enormous value when it is done and delivered.”

Martha Eisenhoffer loves Moorelands Baby Bundles.

For many years, as part of the Telco Community Volunteers Toronto Retirees Club, she has been carefully sewing flannels, burping pads and receiving blankets for Toronto babies born into poverty. For Martha and her colleagues it is clearly a labour of love.

Martha first came to Canada 59 years ago from Hungary. She worked for Bell Canada as an Accounting Clerk for 32 years before retiring in 1984. Since then she has been heavily involved with their retiree volunteer program. From quilting blankets for children in Malawi, to sewing heart pillows for patients at Toronto General Hospital, helping others has been a significant part of her life.

Why Baby Bundles? “I understand the need. I was a young mother once… a long time ago…” she chuckles, “There’s so much you don’t know and it can be a very precarious time, especially for someone on a low income.”

 

“To receive a Moorelands’ Baby Bundle – and along with it the knowledge and the help and support – is an awesome thing.”

Martha goes on to describe what has kept the Bell Retirees’ support for Baby Bundles “going strong” all these years.  “For new moms in poverty,” she explains, “providing for their babies will be hard.” She imagines that most of the items within reach of their budget will be second hand or hand-me-down. “That’s if they have cash to buy the items at all.”

For Martha, the joy of the Baby Bundles program is to be able to provide something “new and beautiful” for these families in need. “Moorelands Baby Bundles is about giving a gift to welcome a child.”

Her passion for the program, and the work that Moorelands undertakes in general, is obvious from Martha’s warmth and enthusiasm as she describes her involvement.

You want to support Moorelands and what they do but you aren’t always in a position to give money. This is a great way to help that has enormous value when it is done and delivered.”

Request a baby bundle

Martha is keen to point out that what she and the other members of the Bell Retirees ‘Sewing Group’ do is “just a part” of the program as a whole.

“Moorelands acts as connector to identify the need and provide service, but it’s very satisfying to be a part of the process. Plus I get to buy some beautiful materials!”

Martha understands the large commitment involved in volunteering and acknowledges that “lots of people express a desire to volunteer but you need to know yourself and what you can afford to offer.”

Well, Martha, Moorelands also understands the fantastic amount of work that you and your colleagues put in. We honour you and thank you for your support!

Please keep your Century Club stories coming!

Contact Helen: hbanham@moorelands.ca or 416-466-9987 ext. 312

Sarah and Cheryle circa 1999

Sarah Le Bar Shares Her Moorelands Story

“Moorelands’ camp is so much more than canoeing & kayaking. It’s learning how to express yourself…to persevere until you get to where you want to be!”

Sarah's Story

Sarah today
Sarah today

When Sarah Le Bar’s mother first suggested that she go to Moorelands’ camp, Sarah, aged 9, was seriously unimpressed.

“I’d been to another camp the year before and it was a terrible experience. I was very reluctant to try camp again.”

But Sarah’s mom, a single-parent raising a child in a low-income, inner-city neighbourhood, knew that the opportunity to get her daughter to Moorelands was too good to miss. And boy, was she right!

After two or three days at Moorelands, I had been transformed.  I loved it so much; I became a camper for life!

An Adventure Away from the City

What was it that made Moorelands’ camp such a different experience for Sarah?

It was ALL fun. The counsellors and staff were amazing. They gave us boundaries but they let us be individuals, let us be ourselves…

 “Going to camp expanded my experiences and helped me learn so much. I did things I’d never have gotten the chance to do back home. I learned to swim!  And not just to swim, but swim in a lake!”

Sarah and friends at Moorelands Wilderness Camp
Sarah and friends at Moorelands Wilderness Camp

Lessons in Self-Expression

At camp, Sarah’s favourite activity was arts and crafts. She would often spend the treasured “free time” sessions in the arts and crafts cabin learning to express herself.

In fact, learning how to communicate properly and express her feelings is one of the enduring skills that Sarah attributes to camp.

“Camp built up my confidence. A lot of people don’t realise that in some households, kids just don’t learn certain skills – like how to communicate effectively – it’s hard to express yourself when no-one teaches you how.

“That’s why camp has so many benefits for inner-city kids. It builds their confidence and teaches them leadership. They learn that they have a voice. They learn that they are important.”

Sarah reading her poem by the flagpole at Moorelands.
Sarah reading her poem by the flagpole at Moorelands.

Treasured Memories

Sarah’s favourite camp memory is of one evening before dinner when the campers were gathered around the flagpole for camp songs.

“I got up and read one of my poems. It’s a moment that’s stayed with me. It felt great to be a part of a community, a team. I would never have had the confidence to do that before… 

These days Sarah is busy working at H&R Block and studying taxation part time. Has camp left any lasting impressions on her?

So many! Moorelands is a beautiful place – you can’t get any better. It taught me a respect for the wilderness that’s stuck with me. I still reminisce about my great times at camp and I’m still in contact with friends I made there.

“I guess the enduring impact is that Moorelands taught me that life is not just about me. It taught me to think about how I can help others, how I can make a difference in my community.”

Thank you, Sarah, for being a part of our community and sharing your story. We’re looking forward to seeing you at camp’s 100th birthday celebrations in the New Year! Merry Christmas!

Help other kids like Sarah experience a wilderness adventure at Moorelands.

Take a look at the equipment needed to make out-tripping adventures happen. Your donation of any size can make all the difference to Toronto kids-in-need.

DONATE

Moorelands Logo - help us help kids

Got a Moorelands Story to Share?

We are gathering Alumni stories in advance of Moorelands Wilderness Camp’s 100th Birthday in 2017. Share your story online with our easy form or contact Helen, hbanham@moorelands.ca, 416-466-9987 ext.312 to share yours!

Beach Blast: senior girls show of their teamwork and creativity with a synchronized swim.

Beach Blast helps kids connect and have fun

There’s nothing that tops a beach party. Or so we at Moorelands like to think! And so, at Moorelands Wilderness Camp, day 5 of each session includes a big ol’ party on Front Beach!

Beach Blast

Juniors and Inters come together to enjoy music, swimming, games, hula contests, limbo contests, and even a dance workout! We want our kids to have fun and enjoy healthy, physical activities with their friends.

Just like a cottage weekend can help adults relax, our campers need time just to kick back too. Beach Blast lets campers enjoy the friendships they’ve made over the week. It encourages them to have fun together away from the stresses of the city. And importantly, it encapsulates the idea of positive connections that is one of the cornerstones of the Moorelands’ 4cs.

Beach Blast also includes a synchronized swim by each of our senior cabins. Seniors work on their synchronized swim over the week and it’s a tool for them to develop their creativity and teamwork skills.

Check out the pics of our kids getting to enjoy their friendships, enjoy being kids and forget about the worries of the world.

Finally, watch one cabin of senior girls explain what they’ve loved about their week at Moorelands and demonstrate the strength of the positive connections they’ve built.

Check back soon for more updates from camp!

Please consider supporting our Send a Kid to Camp Campaign, we’re almost at our goal!Logo 2016 green with help us help kids

Fresh Air Fund, Geoff Morrison as Batman

Being a superhero on a shoestring budget: Fresh Air Fund

After-school Program Head

After-school Program Head

Program Head create a welcoming, safe and positive environment where children aged 6-12 years have fun, make friends and develop life skills. Working with two Program Leaders, Program Head plan and implement snack, activities, visitors and trips for 24 to 27 participants. The After-school Programs are located in Flemingdon Park and Thorncliffe Park.
________________________________________
Hours

  • 18.5 hours per week
  • Program runs from 3 pm – 6pm Monday to Friday starting at the end of September and ending in the middle of June
  • Some additional hours in September for training, during the school year for planning and shopping and in June for clean up
    ________________________________________

Responsibilities

  • Work with the Program Leaders to plan and implement fun, educational and skill developing activities (Including crafts, science, cooking, sports, gym games and more!)
  • Create a welcoming, safe and positive environment
  • Plan and prepare a healthy snack
  • Supervise participants and implement the necessary behaviour management strategies
  • Supervise, support and evaluate the Program Leader and volunteers
  • Maintain professional and friendly relations with our Community Partners and the participants’ parents
  • Complete and submit paperwork and reports
  • Manage the budget for program supplies, food and trips
  • Embody and implement Moorelands goals, policies and procedures
  • Other duties as assigned
    ________________________________________

 Qualifications

  • Standard First Aid
  • Principles of Healthy Child Development High 5 certified
  • Food Handling Certificate
  • Have extensive experience working directly with children aged 6 – 12 years
  • Have experience coordinating programs, activities and events
  • Must have the desire and ability to work with children in an indoor and outdoor setting
  • Proven leadership, organizational and interpersonal skills
  • Be energetic, enthusiastic, patient and flexible
  • Able to work in team and individual settings
  • Experience working in a multi-cultural environment is an asset
  • Knowledge of Flemingdon Park and Thorncliffe Park communities is an asset

________________________________________

Visit our Jobs page to see other positions 

New to working at Moorelands?

Returning Moorelands staff?

After-school Sports Program Leaders

Sports Program Leaders assist the Program Head to create a welcoming, safe and positive environment where children aged 6-12 have fun, make friends and develop life skills. They help plan and implement snack, activities, visitors and trips for 24 to 27 participants. The BLAST Programs are located in Flemingdon Park or Thorncliffe Park.
________________________________________

Hours

  • Up to 15.5 hours per week
  • Program runs from 3pm – 6pm from Monday to Friday starting at the end of September and ending in the middle of June
  • There will be some additional hours in September for training and in June for clean up
    ________________________________________

Responsibilities

  • Work with the Program Head and other Program Leader to plan and implement fun, educational and skill developing activities (Including crafts, science, cooking, sports gym games and much more!)
  • Take the lead in planning and implementing Physical Literacy Programming
  • Help prepare a healthy snack
  • Help supervise participants and implement the necessary behaviour management strategies
  • Support volunteers
  • Maintain professional and friendly relations with our Community Partners and the participants’ parents
  • Complete and submit paperwork and reporting
  • Embody and implement Moorelands goals, policies and procedures
  • Other duties as assigned

________________________________

Qualifications

  • Standard First Aid
  • Principles of Healthy Child Development High 5 Certified
  • Have experience working directly with children aged 6 – 12 years
  • Knowledge in Physical Literacy, sport or coaching an asset
  • Must have the desire and ability to work with children in an indoor and outdoor setting
  • Proven leadership, organizational and interpersonal skills
  • Be energetic, enthusiastic, patient and flexible
  • Able to work in team and individual settings
  • Experience working in a multi-cultural environment is an asset
  • Knowledge of Flemingdon Park and Thorncliffe Park communities is an asset

_______________________________________

Visit our Jobs page to see other positions 

New to working at Moorelands?

Returning Moorelands staff?

Page 1 of 212