After-school program back in "fall" swing

After-School Programs in “Fall” Swing!

Teamwork, Trustworthiness and Problem-solving

Over the past few weeks, our Youth LED kids have been learning about important leadership habits and qualities that they can use to achieve success. The nine-week program covers many important aspects through a fun variety of activities. This past week the students at Valley Park Middle School were developing teamwork and problem-solving skills and learning about the importance of trustworthiness. Check out the pics!

Getting Active After-School

Recent studies highlight the importance of getting kids active and into the outdoors to reap many physical and mental health benefits and improve attainment at school.  BLAST Gateway has been making the most of the beautiful fall weather by playing soccer and developing their physical literacy skills outdoors. Check out the pics of the fun!

 

Cooking Activities help kids develop important life-skills

All those active games help our kids work up quite the appetite! Last week, kids at BLAST had quite the treat when they learned how to bake delicious cupcakes! Take a look at the pics of kids practising teamwork and sharing as they worked together to bake a delicious batch of tasty goodness!

Celebrating Canada150 with some Bannock

Over at BLAST Gateway, kids also took part in a cooking activity but this time they were learning about the traditional Canadian bread – Bannock! At Moorelands Camp, kids learn to make bannock on cookouts and campouts so we brought a little camp to Moorelands BLAST and the kids got to recreate a Canadian campout after-school!
Moorelands Logo - help us help kids

Advice I Wish I’d Had: High School Grads Give Advice on Starting a New Job

Life is a puzzle, you put it together as you go. Some things fit perfectly, while others don’t, but you always wish you had some advice to guide you along your way.

Moorelands VITAL (Volunteers In Training As Leaders) program helps youth develop leadership skills and positive character qualities that will prepare them to succeed in school and the workplace. To help our participants, before they transition from High School to post-secondary education or the world of work, we’ve created a short series of advice articles: Advice I Wish I’d Had.

In this series, University and College students share what they have learned since graduating High School, from transitioning into University or College to finding a summer job. This week find out what advice they give on starting a new job.

Rabia | Communications and Marketing | Ryerson University

Be open to everything. There will always be a few things about a new job that are not stated in the job description. Always be prepared to take on whatever is thrown your way but also know where to draw a line. Your mental health is always more important and make sure to let your coworkers and supervisor(s) know when you need a break.

 

Arianna | Animation | Durham College

Make sure you ask your manager/supervisor all the questions you may have. It’s your first day they know some things may confuse you.

Savannah | Professional Communications | Ryerson University

Be kind to coworkers and build relationships with them. The people you work with can expose you to new opportunities, and you never know when you’ll need a recommendation.

 

Anonymous | Life Sciences | UOIT

Always ask questions if you are not sure if what you are doing is correct or how to deal with a problem.

Anonymous | Practical Nursing | Centennial College

Don’t be afraid to ask questions, it ensures the employee that you take your job seriously

 

Anonymous | Graphic Design | OCAD

You might be flustered trying to learn everything at once. Remember you’re there to learn and your co-workers will understand.

 

Anonymous | Business Technology Management | Ryerson University

It is okay to make mistakes, that’s why it’s called learning. So long as you understand what led you to making that mistake and the approach you should have taken instead, it will be less likely for you to make that mistake going forward.

Mustafa | Neuroscience | University of Toronto

Don’t get anxious. Everyone knows you’re still learning. Give yourself time.

 

Anonymous | Double Major in English and Sociology with an emphasis in Education |  Trent University

Be ready to learn. Things may be tough for the first few days, but you’ll eventually get the hang of it.

Giulia | Professional Communications | Ryerson  University

Go in with an open mind and be ready to learn.

 

Nick | Nuclear Engineering | UOIT

Try to build as many relationships as you can. Having connections is good for networking. This can potentially help you land other jobs further down your career.

 

To learn more about the benefits of building your network read our article Networking Tips for Teens

 

By Vimbai Chikoore

Advice I’d wish I’d Had: High School Grads Give Advice on How to Ace a Job Interview

Life is a puzzle, you put it together as you go. Some things fit perfectly, while others don’t, but you always wish you had some advice to guide you along your way.

Moorelands VITAL (Volunteers In Training As Leaders) program helps youth develop leadership skills and positive character qualities that will prepare them to succeed in the workplace. To help our participants as they transition from High School to post-secondary education or the world of work, we’ve created a short series of advice articles: Advice I Wish I’d Had.

In this series, University and College students share what they have learned since graduating High School, from transitioning into University or College to finding a summer job. This week find out what advice they give on acing job interviews.

Rabia | Communications and Marketing | Ryerson University

It sounds cliche, but preparation is key. Having done research on the company beforehand, knowing the duties of the job, and practicing basic interview questions (e.g. “what are your strengths”, “why do you want to work here”) will take a load off of your mind. Knowing you are prepared will allow you to relax and be more comfortable during the interview which will then allow you to be perceived as confident and ready for the job.

 

Arianna | Animation | Durham College

Always be friendly, smile a lot and always make eye contact

 

Anonymous | Life Sciences | UOIT

Be enthusiastic, confident and keep a smile on your face.

Anonymous | Graphic Design | OCAD

Positive energy is great.

 

Anonymous | Business Technology Management | Ryerson University

Put aside some time to learn about the employer & position you will be interviewing for. You’d be surprised over the amount of people that go into an interview and know next to nothing about the company or position they applied to.

 

Mustafa | Neuroscience | University of Toronto

Confidence confidence confidence. Fake confidence till it’s genuine. Its actually worked well for me.

Anonymous | Double Major in English and Sociology with an emphasis in Education |  Trent University

Be true and be you. If it’s meant for you, then trust that it will be given to you.

 

Nick | Nuclear Engineering | UOIT

Practice beforehand. Practicing beforehand enables you to go in with confidence.

 

Giulia | Professional Communications | Ryerson  University

Research the company before hand and have default answers to traditional questions i.e. name a time you had to deal with stress etc.

 

By Vimbai Chikoore

Sabina - youth led advocate

Sabina

Sabina is 13 years old and, as we all know, being 13 can be tough. Before she came to Moorelands Youth LED (Lead Excel Demonstrate) program, she was “a shy type of person”. Sabina never put herself forward and didn’t have the confidence to speak up in class. She also struggled to make friends and as a result hated going to school. Things got so bad in fact that she began making up excuses to stay at home telling her mother she was sick.

When her grades suffered, her guidance counsellor referred her to Moorelands Youth LED program. It was the beginning of a new chapter in Sabina’s life.

At Youth LED, she learned the leadership skills that would help her overcome her shyness. Interacting with her fellow participants, she built skills like communication that she’d lacked before. As her strength in teamwork grew, so she grew in confidence. Sabina began to realise that, in fact, she was a pretty awesome group leader and that her input was valuable.

With the encouragement of her Youth LED leaders, Sabina applied the skills she had learned in Youth LED to her school life.  She started raising her hand and participating in class. Her grades improved and she felt more at ease with her classmates. Now Sabina is a Youth LED advocate and tells all her new friends to join the program too.

It costs $740 to send Sabina to Youth LED for a semester including an end of program leadership retreat. This year will be Sabina’s second year, make a donation now to help her continue her growth.

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Advice I Wish I’d Had: High School Grads Give Advice On Getting A Job

Life is a puzzle, you put it together as you go. Some things fit perfectly, while others don’t, but you always wish you had some advice to guide you along your way.

Moorelands VITAL (Volunteers In Training As Leaders) program helps youth develop leadership skills and positive character qualities that will prepare them to succeed in school and the workplace. To help our participants, before they transition from High School to post-secondary education or the world of work, we’ve created a short series of advice articles: Advice I Wish I’d Had.

In this series, University and College students share what they have learned since graduating High School, from transitioning into University or College to finding a summer job. This week find out what advice they give on getting a job.

Rabia | Communications and Marketing | Ryerson University

Step out of your comfort zone, and ask for help. You might never know who might need your assistance, so hand out your resumes everywhere. The most crucial step is to go in person and talk to them, even if you know that the application is online. Introduce yourself and talk about your experiences and/or what you can offer them (E.g. flexible hours, related skillset, etc). Always be professional no matter where you are applying and who you are talking to- first impressions carry a lot of weight in this situation.

 

Arianna | Animation | Durham College

Applying to jobs is a job in itself; if you apply to 20 different places you might only hear back from 1. Don’t let it discourage you and keep trying.

 

Anonymous | Practical Nursing | Centennial College

It’s better to get a summer job instead of working during the academic year. It may take a toll on both you and your studies

Anonymous | Graphic Design | OCAD

Even if you have low self esteem, try and sell yourself as well as you can.

 

Anonymous | Business Technology Management | Ryerson University

Put yourself out there! Don’t be shy when it comes to applying to a position. Apply to as many that you can (within your skill-set, of course) and if all goes well, you’ll get called in for an interview

Savannah | Professional Communications | Ryerson University

Learn how to sell yourself. Figure out what your best qualities are and learn how to present them to employers, and always have examples to back up your statements.

 

Anonymous | Double Major in English and Sociology with an emphasis in Education |  Trent University

Keep an open mind, you have to start somewhere. So if you feel like you’re at the bottom of the totem pole, then don’t stress or get upset, because the only place to go from there is up.

 

Giulia | Professional Communications | Ryerson  University

If you’re not hearing anything back apply in person and tweak your resume.

 

Nick | Nuclear Engineering | UOIT

Apply to as many places as you can. Getting as many interviews is key to getting a job as it gives you more practice in your interviews and increases your chances of landing at least one of the jobs. Also having connections works as that’s a bonus.

 

Want to perfect your resume writing skills? Read our article How to Write the Best Resume.

 

By Vimbai Chikoore

Advice I wish I’d had: Post-Secondary Students Give Advice About Transitioning Into Post-Secondary

Life is a puzzle, you put it together as you go. Some things fit perfectly, while others don’t, but you always wish you had some advice to guide you along your way.

Moorelands VITAL (Volunteers In Training As Leaders) program helps youth develop leadership skills and positive character qualities that will prepare them to succeed in school and the workplace. To help our participants, before they transition from High School to post-secondary education or the world of work, we’ve created a short series of advice articles: Advice I Wish I’d Had.

In this series, University and College students share what they have learned since graduating High School, from transitioning into University or College to finding a summer job. This week find out what advice they give on making career moves.

Rabia | Communications and Marketing | Ryerson University

Be open to all and any opportunities that come your way. University/college has endless possibilities, and it would be a waste not to take advantage of them. Talk to new people, join more clubs, take fun courses. The next few years are crucial, and it is up to you to decide how you would like to spend them. As much as studying is important, so is your mental health. Take a break, meet new people, step out of your comfort zone, and ask for help when you need it. Now is the time to put your needs first.

 

Arianna | Animation | Durham College

Make sure to stay on top of your assignments, the workload is much greater than high school. It’s important not to fall behind.

 

Anonymous | Business Technology Management | Ryerson University

Don’t fall behind in making good notes, you won’t regret it when exams come around!

 

Anonymous | Life Sciences | UOIT
Make friends and don’t be afraid of change. Use the school’s studying sessions, it’s there to help. If you can’t make it to those sessions, make your own with friends and go over notes and practices together.

Anonymous | Practical Nursing | Centennial College

Be prepared, it’s a pretty big step when leaving from high school and going into post secondary.

 

Anonymous | Graphic Design | OCAD

Making friends will help a lot

Mustafa | Neuroscience | University of Toronto

Be organized. Even when it seems like there isn’t much to do.

 

Savannah | Professional Communications | Ryerson University

It’s okay to not know exactly where you want to go with your degree right off the bat. Post secondary education is about learning and growing and eventually, you will figure out your path.

 

Anonymous | Double Major in English and Sociology with an emphasis in Education |  Trent University

Don’t stress about the little things, always keep the big picture in mind. Those weekly participation quizzes don’t weigh as much as that final exam. Also, don’t worry about meeting people, if you’re open and friendly, they will come to you.

Nick | Nuclear Engineering | UOIT

Stay on top of your work. University will leave you behind if you do not stay on top of your work. Managing 6 courses a semester that all have lectures, labs and tutorials will make it really hard to catch up once you fall behind. You should be attending every lecture, taking notes, and then reviewing these notes later at home before you sleep. Stay on top of your assignments, and do all practice questions. It’s a lot of work but it is required if you want to do well in university. However that being said, it is important to balance extracurricular activities (if you have any), free time and school work. Finding a good balance is most important because you do not want to burn out. So you can enjoy things and have fun just don’t fall behind school. There will always be time to set aside for yourself.

 

Giulia | Professional Communications | Ryerson  University

Take classes in anything that interest you.

Why Volunteer? 5 Reasons Why Volunteering Can Help You Secure Your Dream Job.

Why volunteer? Volunteering is not just a great way to give back to your community, it can also give you the extra push you need to get your dream job or at least get your foot into the industry of your choice. It will help you gain experience, build your network and boost your resume.

Gain experience

Volunteering in your industry allows you to gain experience and insider knowledge. The classroom doesn’t always do the best job of conveying the intricacies of an industry or giving you hands-on experience. Through volunteering, you can gain industry knowledge and gain useful experience. You can learn about workflows, how companies or departments operate, and what the expectation for employees are.

Networking Opportunities 

You can use your position as a volunteer to network. Talk to as many people as you can, find out about the industry, about their experience in the field, etc. You can gain a lot of insight into the industry through networking. Not only that but you never know what positive effects can come from someone in your network. For example, a graphic designer I know was asked to design a logo for a small organization, but that organization needed someone to create their website. Being in each other’s network, she recommended me for the role. It was a great step forward in my career.

Confidence builder

It can be scary going into a new industry or a new job especially if it’s for the first time. Volunteering allows you to shake off the fear. The learning curve when starting a new job can be intimidating; it can shake your confidence. Volunteering can help build that confidence and help ease the transition into a new job and work environment. Picking a career can be a stressful decision but volunteering allows you to try working in an industry that you’re interested in. You can figure out your career goals without making too much of an investment.

Two girls at the lake.

Resume booster

The experience, skills, and knowledge you get from volunteering can be translated onto your resume. Whether or not the volunteering you do is industry specific you will be developing important leadership skills such as communication and teamwork skills.

Additionally, you may be able to develop skills that you need to further your career that you are unable to hone in your current job. Let’s say, for example, you are currently working in customer service but would like to move into project management. Volunteering for a charity that is working on a big event can offer you the chance to gain some important project management skills to add to your resume. So the next time you go in for an interview you can show that have workplace experience, leadership skills, and/or knowledge of the industry.

Foot in the door

Volunteering in your industry or the company you want to work for allows you to get your foot in the door. Sure it’s an unpaid position, but the benefits of your volunteer work outweigh the rest. Through a volunteer position, you can show your work ethic, professionalism, and knowledge outside of an interview. It will leave a stronger impression on the people around you and can lead to a paid position in the company.

 

Seek volunteer opportunities as much as you seek paid opportunities.

Written by Vimbai Chikoore

girl posing with two guys at Moorelands event

Networking Tips for Teens

Networking means getting to know people; fostering relationships and creating a network of people that can lead to great opportunities. A person in your network is someone who can support you professionally or help you find opportunities to work, volunteer, gain experience or make valuable connections.

 

If you are looking for a job, volunteer experiences, scholarships, etc, then you have probably done a bit of networking already. Also you probably know that everyone around you is networking, so here are some networking tips for teens that can help you stand out from the crowd.

Use Social Media

Use social media? You might be thinking, who is more of an expert other than you!? Well actually, if you want to use social media for social networking, it may be time to slightly change the way you use the various social platforms. Use social media to interact with companies, employers, colleges, and universities. It may help you stand out from the crowd. Remember to keep in mind that your social media accounts are public, so present yourself in an appropriate and positive way.

One valuable social media site for professional networking is LinkedIn. It’s a great platform to make connections, find opportunities and find jobs. It’s never too early to make an account. And don’t just stop with creating your profile. To truly network using the site, you need to join groups that are relevant to your career path. So for example, if you want a career in media or marketing, you might choose to join a group like Media & Marketing Professionals Worldwide where you can keep up to date with relevant news and events, post content that you think others will find interesting (to get noticed!) and join in the conversation by commenting on other people’s posts.

Be Prepared

Before you go to a networking event, practice! Practice how you will introduce yourself, your body language, your handshake, your facial expressions.  Prepare for questions such as “tell me about yourself” or “tell me about your experiences”, practice asking questions too. Practice everything that you will do or think you will do. If you need to show materials such as a portfolio or resume, have those prepared. Being prepared will help you feel more comfortable and ready.

 

Need some help coming up with questions? Here is a useful list of Networking Questions to Ask by Harvard Law School

Everything is an Opportunity

Treat every day and everyone you meet as an opportunity to network. Classmates, teachers, counselors, coaches, and friends could help you find opportunities, get information or help connect you to someone else. So from now, be alert to those people in your life and consider how they might connect you to an opportunity. If someone you know if so kind as to offer you an introduction to a great new connection or opportunity, never let it pass you by! Make sure you follow up with whatever it is that they have put in front of you and show your appreciation for them taking an interest in you and your career.

two girls talking

Context

Lastly, not every networking opportunity requires you to be formal or professional, the majority of the people in your network you meet and interact with casually. So keep it casual, remember that the people in your network are your parents, your friends, your teachers etc, so treat them as such.

Networking can seem stressful and tough but keep these tips in mind and it will become fun.

 

 

Written by Vimbai Chikoore

Getting together with our community and seeing our leaders grow

Hey Moorelands!

On April 14, 2016, the Moorelands community came together to enjoy our Annual General Meeting. It was great to see so many community members – donors, staff, volunteers, alumni and participants – out in force to look back on our successes in 2015 and learn about how our community will continue to grow stronger in 2016.

A community united

Moorelands’ President, David Dorsch, kicked off proceedings by sharing a wonderful video of some great moments in Moorelands Wilderness Camp. It was a great community event with thank yous and goodbyes to some of our fantastic retiring Board Members: Judy Moore, Robert Black, Geoff Wilson, Michael Sital, Natasha Bronfman and Karen Finnemore. Plus a warm welcome was given to new Board members – Andrew Pollock and Elaine Lukowski.

Moorelands celebrated some of the wonderful achievements from 2015 such as programs going from strength to strength and the creation of an Alumni Group to keep our community connected. We also got to celebrate two amazing long-standing volunteers – Diane Hopkins and Carole Legget. Learn more about their achievements here.

A highlight of the afternoon was hearing from Moorelands Youth Lead Excel Demonstrate (LED) Alum, Khalida. Check out the video above as she explains why Moorelands matters to her. It’s so wonderful to watch Khalida putting her fantastic communication skills, developed at Youth LED, to great effect! Thank you, Khalida, for sharing your story with us and for staying a part of the Moorelands community!

On the subject of Youth LED, the program is now in full swing over at Valley Park Middle School!

In the past few weeks, participants have begun to learn about communication, completing tasks where different types of communication were necessary and the challenges that came with them. In one activity, participants worked in pairs to practise clarity in communication. The partners sat back to back and one partner had to describe an image to the other, while their counterpart drew what was being described.

In another activity, they had to use one form of communication to describe a popular person/movie/sport to their team (much like charades), their options were writing, drawing, using Play-Doh, physically acting it out or verbally describing without the use of certain words.

Check out the pics and the video below of our participants rising to these challenges!

Finally, tickets are on-sale now for Moorelands’ gala 2016 starring Andrew Cash: Cash for Moorelands.  The event takes place at the stunning lakeside setting of the Palais Royale and will feature delicious food, an open bar and of course fantastic entertainment. Tickets are $150, including a $75 tax receipt – all proceeds will go towards Moorelands’ vital programs like Youth LED featured above. Buy your tickets now, don’t delay!

Have a great week,

Best High res just Moorelands

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