Advice I’d wish I’d Had: High School Grads Give Advice on How to Ace a Job Interview

Life is a puzzle, you put it together as you go. Some things fit perfectly, while others don’t, but you always wish you had some advice to guide you along your way.

Moorelands VITAL (Volunteers In Training As Leaders) program helps youth develop leadership skills and positive character qualities that will prepare them to succeed in the workplace. To help our participants as they transition from High School to post-secondary education or the world of work, we’ve created a short series of advice articles: Advice I Wish I’d Had.

In this series, University and College students share what they have learned since graduating High School, from transitioning into University or College to finding a summer job. This week find out what advice they give on acing job interviews.

Rabia | Communications and Marketing | Ryerson University

It sounds cliche, but preparation is key. Having done research on the company beforehand, knowing the duties of the job, and practicing basic interview questions (e.g. “what are your strengths”, “why do you want to work here”) will take a load off of your mind. Knowing you are prepared will allow you to relax and be more comfortable during the interview which will then allow you to be perceived as confident and ready for the job.

 

Arianna | Animation | Durham College

Always be friendly, smile a lot and always make eye contact

 

Anonymous | Life Sciences | UOIT

Be enthusiastic, confident and keep a smile on your face.

Anonymous | Graphic Design | OCAD

Positive energy is great.

 

Anonymous | Business Technology Management | Ryerson University

Put aside some time to learn about the employer & position you will be interviewing for. You’d be surprised over the amount of people that go into an interview and know next to nothing about the company or position they applied to.

 

Mustafa | Neuroscience | University of Toronto

Confidence confidence confidence. Fake confidence till it’s genuine. Its actually worked well for me.

Anonymous | Double Major in English and Sociology with an emphasis in Education |  Trent University

Be true and be you. If it’s meant for you, then trust that it will be given to you.

 

Nick | Nuclear Engineering | UOIT

Practice beforehand. Practicing beforehand enables you to go in with confidence.

 

Giulia | Professional Communications | Ryerson  University

Research the company before hand and have default answers to traditional questions i.e. name a time you had to deal with stress etc.

 

By Vimbai Chikoore

Peter and Marg Anne Jones - Century Club Members

Peter and Marg Anne Jones’ Story

“The work that Moorelands does is seminal…you have to support families and you have to start right at the beginning and keep the support going…”

Century Club Members, Peter and Marg Anne Jones, Share their Story

DCA Urban Work - Three Children with Worker, 1970
DCA Urban Work - Three Children with Worker, 1970s

Former Board member, Peter Jones, and his wife, Marg Anne, have been supporting Moorelands since Peter’s time on the board from the mid-1970s to mid-1980s.

They were introduced to Moorelands (then the DCA) as part of the congregation of St. James Cathedral. Peter reminisces, “Michael Bedford-Jones was one of the curates at St. James and he was also on the board of the DCA. He was a good friend of ours and he recruited us to generally help out.

40 Years of Support

Peter, who eventually became chairman, fondly remembers the DCA community made up of “talented people who committed a lot of time and raised a lot of money.

When I ask them what has inspired their continued support over 40 years, Marg Anne explains: “Moorelands is so effective because if you lay on the support, when it needs to be laid on at the very beginning, then families have hope and they are able to respond…

Moorelands’ mission, to support families and children in poverty sums it up, doesn’t it? That’s what you do. And you do it very well, I think.

Kawagama Kids on the Trail circa 1975
Kawagama Kids on the Trail circa 1975
DCA Associates Tea, St Pauls, 1970s
DCA Associates Tea, St Pauls, 1970s
Aerial View of Moorelands Camp, 1972
Aerial View of Moorelands Camp, 1972
DCA Urban Daycare, 1977
DCA Urban Daycare, 1977

Benefits of Both Camp and City Programs

Peter and Marg Anne’s own children went to camp. Marg Anne tells us, “They benefited immensely. They always seemed to be more grown up when they got home; they learned cooperation.

Peter adds: “another factor we found out in retrospect was that the kids who went to Moorelands Camp were frequently motivated to do well in school. They now had a vision of their future and what they could achieve.

The couple has always been very interested in Moorelands’ work in the city. Marg Anne explains, “I love the after-school program. So many parents are working parents. Moorelands provides a wonderful opportunity for the children to interact with people who are caring and good role models. They help them with schoolwork and the kind of assistance that maybe they wouldn’t get at home.”

Investing in their Community

Today, Peter and Marg Anne are both retired and continue their work in the community. Along with their support for Moorelands, Marg Anne sits on the Board of Parent Child Mother Goose, an organization that offers free parent support programs focusing on early intervention. Peter told us more about their work as volunteers at Out of the Cold.

Community investment is clearly important to them both as Peter explains, “We’re very fortunate to be where we are. And I believe that should carry with it a sense of compassion towards others who are less fortunate.

Marg Anne adds that she has always been appreciative of the thank you cards they receive from camp: “I think that is such a wonderful thing, that you really directly know that you have reached a child and benefited them.

who we are Jenga at BLAST
Two girls at the lake.

Thank you, Peter and Marg Anne, for your amazing support and for investing so much in your community!

Why not share your own Moorelands story or make a donation to empower Toronto kids in need?

Christine and Carole Alumni Day

Christine and Carol Share Their Story

“It was like a dream come true to go to Moorelands Camp and escape from the traffic noise, pollution and congestion…”

Christine and Carol's Moorelands Story

Christine and Carole at Alumni Day
Christine and Carole at Alumni Day

At Alumni Day 2017 (July 15th) we got the chance to catch up with two campers from the 1960s, sisters Christine and Carol. Here, Christine tells their story:

“Moorelands Camp at Beaverton first came to our attention through Constance Hood who of St. Stephen’s-in-the-Fields Anglican Church, and through her, we joined this church shortly after moving to Toronto.  She also happened to be one of the directors of the DCA and a well-known leader at the camp.  I attended the girls’ camp for 5 years in the early ‘60s and my sister, Carol, attended for 3 years starting in the late ‘50s.

Moorelands Camp at Beaverton

“We have great memories of Moorelands Camp which was situated on a very picturesque area of land overlooking Lake Simcoe. There was a fair bit of lawn all through the camp, so it was not a rustic setting by any means.  The three long dormitories for the campers were named:  Sunset (the yellow one), Lakeview (green), and Woodlands (brown), and there was also this lovely quaint chapel at the far end of camp that had this lovely pine smell as you entered.

Bishop Hunt, Constance Hood & Beatrice Thorne circa 1962
Bishop Hunt, Constance Hood & Beatrice Thorne circa 1962
Carol in 1961
Carol in 1961

Memories to Last a Lifetime

“The swim lessons were invaluable in helping to overcome my fear of water.  My first year, the biggest thrill was being awarded a copper cup for most improved swimmer.  Carol’s most memorable highlight was winning the reward for having the neatest dorm.  She was so motivated to win that she and her roommate ended up cleaning some of the other campers’ rooms!  In the end, it was worth all their hard work.

“Meal times were fun. We sang and clapped to the “gilly gilly wash wash” song, with each table shouting out the names of various tribes assigned to us.  The food was excellent and nourishing. As there was no automatic dishwasher back then, an adult volunteer washed the dishes and the campers took turns in groups, drying them – a somewhat daunting task – but there was also a sense of accomplishment and relief when we finished.

Looking Back at How Camp Was

“Nightly entertainment in the rec hall for skits, songs, and games was so enjoyable.  The variety of crafts, the tuck shop, mail time, and the long walk to the town of Beaverton also stand out.  Then there were the flag raising/lowering ceremonies.  Each morning three campers were assigned to hoist the flag up the pole and each evening three more would lower it.  We always felt a bit nervous hoping we wouldn`t mess up!

“The evening campfire was something we all looked forward to.  They always started out with “Fire’s Burning” and ended with “Day is Done”. Although there was no archery, kayaking or canoeing, there was plenty to keep us busy.

“After Moorelands, I attended Camp High Adventure on Sparrow Lake for two years. We both started full-time work right after high school as money was tight back then.  Apart from raising our own families, Carol has been, and is still, heavily involved with her Anglican Church for the past 40 years, lending her time and support where needed.  I went back to college 15 years ago, completing a legal diploma program, while also doing volunteer work at a retirement home.

Christine in Toronto, 1966
Christine in Toronto, 1966
Christine at Camp in 1966
Christine at Camp in 1966
Christine and Carol relive memories at alumni day
Christine and Carol relive memories at alumni day

The Importance of Giving Back

“Moorelands taught us early on about giving back to the community in the same way we were helped.  We are grateful to Mrs. Hood and the DCA to have given us this opportunity as we lived in one of the busiest streets in downtown Toronto, and right across from a busy car wash at that, so it was like a dream come true to escape from the traffic noise, pollution and congestion!”

Share YOUR Story Too!

We love reading the stories of those who have been to Moorelands – either as participants or staff. Alumni, why not share your own Moorelands story too?

Don’t forget to sign up to join our Alumni Group to keep up to date with alumni news and events and opportunities to get involved with Moorelands.

Sabina - youth led advocate

Sabina

Sabina is 13 years old and, as we all know, being 13 can be tough. Before she came to Moorelands Youth LED (Lead Excel Demonstrate) program, she was “a shy type of person”. Sabina never put herself forward and didn’t have the confidence to speak up in class. She also struggled to make friends and as a result hated going to school. Things got so bad in fact that she began making up excuses to stay at home telling her mother she was sick.

When her grades suffered, her guidance counsellor referred her to Moorelands Youth LED program. It was the beginning of a new chapter in Sabina’s life.

At Youth LED, she learned the leadership skills that would help her overcome her shyness. Interacting with her fellow participants, she built skills like communication that she’d lacked before. As her strength in teamwork grew, so she grew in confidence. Sabina began to realise that, in fact, she was a pretty awesome group leader and that her input was valuable.

With the encouragement of her Youth LED leaders, Sabina applied the skills she had learned in Youth LED to her school life.  She started raising her hand and participating in class. Her grades improved and she felt more at ease with her classmates. Now Sabina is a Youth LED advocate and tells all her new friends to join the program too.

It costs $740 to send Sabina to Youth LED for a semester including an end of program leadership retreat. This year will be Sabina’s second year, make a donation now to help her continue her growth.

Donate

help kids by supporting Moorelands after school programs

How You Can Help Kids By Supporting Moorelands After-school Programs

After-school Program = Setting Kids Up For Success

Read on to learn what can be achieved this fall at Moorelands After-school programs with your help!

after-school programs - blast boy reading

Improved Academic Results

Kids from low-income neighbourhoods are falling behind their middle-class peers – reports confirm economic disparities result in academic disparities. At BLAST after-school program, super fun activities teach kids, grades 1-6, vital skills needed to succeed in school… PLUS we offer homework help every day. Amira, a BLAST parent told us: “The wide-ranging activities kids do help them learn and understand different things. That includes science, arts and crafts and reading.”

after-school program - youth LED kids

Benefits to Mental Health

Kids affected by poverty are 3X more likely to experience isolation and depression. 78% of Youth LED after-school program kids, grades 7 and 8, told us that Youth LED helped them feel safer, more confident and make new friends.  Maia, told us: “Moorelands has taught me about being safe and being confident and trying my best.”

 

VITAL at BLAST-A-THON

Reduced Behaviour Issues

Kids growing up in poverty are more likely to engage in/are at-risk of delinquent behaviours. You can affect these behaviours by supporting any Moorelands after-school program. All Moorelands kids and youth develop leadership skills Daveed, age 15 and enrolled in VITAL, told us: “Something I learned that will help me outside of Moorelands is being respectful. Even if someone is mean to someone else, I now have ways to diffuse the situation and get them to stop.”

after-school program and heatlthy kids

Healthier, More Active Kids

There’s a direct correlation between neighbourhood income and kids being at risk of obesity and Type 2 Diabetes. 94% of parents reported that they felt the BLAST program encouraged their child to be more active. Rupal, a BLAST parent told us: “Now my kids are more self-confident and more active… It’s safe, affordable and fun!”

 

after-school program - smiling girl at BLAST

A Safe Space to Learn & Grow

Toronto is ‘Canada’s child poverty capital.’ Many working parents cannot afford childcare after school. All spots at Moorelands After-school programs are subsidized and geared to income. Leisha, a BLAST parent, told us: “The program helps me to make my crazy schedule easier. Being a full-time working mom I do appreciate all your help. Knowing Moorelands is there for my kids to ensure their safety and encourage them to be better kids – it means we will all have a stronger future, together.”

You can help kids achieve these positive outcomes by supporting our after-school programs today.

Donate online here: Donate

Look how much good your gifts to Moorelands can do

Look How Much Good Your Gifts To Moorelands Can Do

THANK YOU for your gifts to Moorelands this year!

So far this year, your gifts to Moorelands have already made an amazing impact in the lives of Toronto kids in need.  Check out some of the ways your support in the Send a Kid to Camp campaign made a BIG difference this summer.

Your gifts to Moorelands - Camp girls hanging out

A Safe Space

YOU gave 518 campers a safe place to just be kids and explore nature away from the pressures of the city. Grace, age 10, told us she loved her time at camp because “I learned that one of my strengths is trying new things… and now I am (sort of) not afraid of spiders…!”

your gifts to Moorelands - proud boy with staff with character badge

Positive Role Models

YOU provided campers with 50 well-trained staff. 93% of campers reported that they had strong connections to positive staff role models. Ryan, age 8, told us: “I learned a lot from my cabin leaders and I can surely use respect and teamwork in my daily life to keep a good reputation. Thank you!”

your gifts to Moorelands - girl learning to swim

Water Safety

YOU gave 179 non-swimmers the chance to learn how to swim. Sara, age 12, told us: “The only chance I get to swim is at camp, and I love it so much! The water is amazing!”

your gifts to Moorelands - older boy helping younger girl on high ropes

Leadership Skills

YOU provided the opportunity for campers to improve their leadership skills: 91% said they are more responsible because of camp. Brayden, age 13, told us: “Because of camp I feel like now I care for others more. I can use this to be more respectful and responsible at home.”

Your gifts to Moorelands - boy by the frogpond

From Camp to Community

YOUR efforts through the Send a Kid to Camp Campaign paid the fees for 219 Moorelands campers. Mark, age 13, told us his time at camp will help him at home: What I learned at camp can help me outside of Moorelands because I can help spread positivity in my community.”

A special thank you from a camper parent:

“Just wanted to say this year at Moorelands was absolutely fantastic and a huge success. I know you always do your best for the kids but this year was special. The counsellors were absolutely phenomenal. Both my boys were thrilled… Keep up the very good job. Way to go! BRAVO! And a huge thank you to those who helped us get to camp,  from the bottom of my heart! :)”

THANK YOU for your gifts to Moorelands!

Scotiabank Training Weekends 2017

Scotiabank Staff Training Weekends 2017

If you really want to be a successful leader, you must develop other leaders around you. You must develop a team of leaders!”  John C. Maxwell

Staff Training - Developing Moorelands Leaders

Scotiabank staff training 2017

Moorelands staff members are an integral part of our after-school programs. We are so fortunate to receive generous funding for our staff training from Scotiabank to prepare staff for the important job ahead of them. Our staff training is focused on how team members can support Toronto kids in their leadership development. Team building and leadership focused activities are used to help staff build trust, connections and their own personal leadership skills.

Know, Grow, Show

Over several training sessions in September, staff learn about our inclusive culture, values and commitment to Positive Youth Development; Moorelands leadership habits and qualities; creating fun and engaging activities for our participants that help them know, grow and show; and how to ensure a safe and healthy environment for everyone at Moorelands.

At Moorelands We Are Intentional

Our staff training is vigorous because at Moorelands we are intentional: We intend that children will gain skills, experience personal growth, gain confidence and make friends because they have been to Moorelands. Therefore, it’s important that our staff leaders are intentional too. At staff training they learn how to plan activities with a purpose, create teachable moments and maximize the opportunities they have to positively influence the children and youth we serve.

Our after-school program staff are awesome and we can’t wait for them to demonstrate their skills in our BLAST, YOUTH LED and VITAL leadership programs in Thorncliffe Park and Flemington Park. All spots in our programs are subsidized. If you’d like to learn more about our programs or complete an application form for your child online, click here.

We’re so excited for after-school programs to start again next week. Thank you, Scotiabank, for giving our staff the opportunity to develop the tools both they, and our kids, need to succeed.

Moorelands Logo - help us help kids

Advice I Wish I’d Had: High School Grads Give Advice On Getting A Job

Life is a puzzle, you put it together as you go. Some things fit perfectly, while others don’t, but you always wish you had some advice to guide you along your way.

Moorelands VITAL (Volunteers In Training As Leaders) program helps youth develop leadership skills and positive character qualities that will prepare them to succeed in school and the workplace. To help our participants, before they transition from High School to post-secondary education or the world of work, we’ve created a short series of advice articles: Advice I Wish I’d Had.

In this series, University and College students share what they have learned since graduating High School, from transitioning into University or College to finding a summer job. This week find out what advice they give on getting a job.

Rabia | Communications and Marketing | Ryerson University

Step out of your comfort zone, and ask for help. You might never know who might need your assistance, so hand out your resumes everywhere. The most crucial step is to go in person and talk to them, even if you know that the application is online. Introduce yourself and talk about your experiences and/or what you can offer them (E.g. flexible hours, related skillset, etc). Always be professional no matter where you are applying and who you are talking to- first impressions carry a lot of weight in this situation.

 

Arianna | Animation | Durham College

Applying to jobs is a job in itself; if you apply to 20 different places you might only hear back from 1. Don’t let it discourage you and keep trying.

 

Anonymous | Practical Nursing | Centennial College

It’s better to get a summer job instead of working during the academic year. It may take a toll on both you and your studies

Anonymous | Graphic Design | OCAD

Even if you have low self esteem, try and sell yourself as well as you can.

 

Anonymous | Business Technology Management | Ryerson University

Put yourself out there! Don’t be shy when it comes to applying to a position. Apply to as many that you can (within your skill-set, of course) and if all goes well, you’ll get called in for an interview

Savannah | Professional Communications | Ryerson University

Learn how to sell yourself. Figure out what your best qualities are and learn how to present them to employers, and always have examples to back up your statements.

 

Anonymous | Double Major in English and Sociology with an emphasis in Education |  Trent University

Keep an open mind, you have to start somewhere. So if you feel like you’re at the bottom of the totem pole, then don’t stress or get upset, because the only place to go from there is up.

 

Giulia | Professional Communications | Ryerson  University

If you’re not hearing anything back apply in person and tweak your resume.

 

Nick | Nuclear Engineering | UOIT

Apply to as many places as you can. Getting as many interviews is key to getting a job as it gives you more practice in your interviews and increases your chances of landing at least one of the jobs. Also having connections works as that’s a bonus.

 

Want to perfect your resume writing skills? Read our article How to Write the Best Resume.

 

By Vimbai Chikoore

Advice I wish I’d had: Post-Secondary Students Give Advice About Transitioning Into Post-Secondary

Life is a puzzle, you put it together as you go. Some things fit perfectly, while others don’t, but you always wish you had some advice to guide you along your way.

Moorelands VITAL (Volunteers In Training As Leaders) program helps youth develop leadership skills and positive character qualities that will prepare them to succeed in school and the workplace. To help our participants, before they transition from High School to post-secondary education or the world of work, we’ve created a short series of advice articles: Advice I Wish I’d Had.

In this series, University and College students share what they have learned since graduating High School, from transitioning into University or College to finding a summer job. This week find out what advice they give on making career moves.

Rabia | Communications and Marketing | Ryerson University

Be open to all and any opportunities that come your way. University/college has endless possibilities, and it would be a waste not to take advantage of them. Talk to new people, join more clubs, take fun courses. The next few years are crucial, and it is up to you to decide how you would like to spend them. As much as studying is important, so is your mental health. Take a break, meet new people, step out of your comfort zone, and ask for help when you need it. Now is the time to put your needs first.

 

Arianna | Animation | Durham College

Make sure to stay on top of your assignments, the workload is much greater than high school. It’s important not to fall behind.

 

Anonymous | Business Technology Management | Ryerson University

Don’t fall behind in making good notes, you won’t regret it when exams come around!

 

Anonymous | Life Sciences | UOIT
Make friends and don’t be afraid of change. Use the school’s studying sessions, it’s there to help. If you can’t make it to those sessions, make your own with friends and go over notes and practices together.

Anonymous | Practical Nursing | Centennial College

Be prepared, it’s a pretty big step when leaving from high school and going into post secondary.

 

Anonymous | Graphic Design | OCAD

Making friends will help a lot

Mustafa | Neuroscience | University of Toronto

Be organized. Even when it seems like there isn’t much to do.

 

Savannah | Professional Communications | Ryerson University

It’s okay to not know exactly where you want to go with your degree right off the bat. Post secondary education is about learning and growing and eventually, you will figure out your path.

 

Anonymous | Double Major in English and Sociology with an emphasis in Education |  Trent University

Don’t stress about the little things, always keep the big picture in mind. Those weekly participation quizzes don’t weigh as much as that final exam. Also, don’t worry about meeting people, if you’re open and friendly, they will come to you.

Nick | Nuclear Engineering | UOIT

Stay on top of your work. University will leave you behind if you do not stay on top of your work. Managing 6 courses a semester that all have lectures, labs and tutorials will make it really hard to catch up once you fall behind. You should be attending every lecture, taking notes, and then reviewing these notes later at home before you sleep. Stay on top of your assignments, and do all practice questions. It’s a lot of work but it is required if you want to do well in university. However that being said, it is important to balance extracurricular activities (if you have any), free time and school work. Finding a good balance is most important because you do not want to burn out. So you can enjoy things and have fun just don’t fall behind school. There will always be time to set aside for yourself.

 

Giulia | Professional Communications | Ryerson  University

Take classes in anything that interest you.

Advice I Wish I’d Had: High School Grads Talk About What They Wish They Knew Upon Graduating

Life is a puzzle, you put it together as you go. Some things fit perfectly, while others don’t, but you always wish you had some advice to guide you along your way.

Moorelands VITAL (Volunteers In Training As Leaders) program helps youth develop leadership skills and positive character qualities that will prepare them to succeed in school and the workplace. To help our participants, before they transition from High School to post-secondary education or the world of work, we’ve created a short series of advice articles: Advice I Wish I’d Had.

In this series, University and College students share what they have learned since graduating High School, from transitioning into University or College to finding a summer job. This week find out what advice they give on making career moves.

Rabia | Communications and Marketing | Ryerson University

Everything is changing but change can be good. Now is the time to discover yourself, and see what you truly like, dislike, and where you see yourself headed. The next few months might seem scary but you are not alone, and all will be well.

 

Anonymous | Life Sciences | UOIT

Be confident and work hard on what you like. Don’t be discouraged just because you failed or performed poorly, it’s a step to success. Motivation is key.

 

Anonymous | Practical  Nursing | Centennial College

Don’t take everything for granted, enjoy your time in high school now before it’s too late

Anonymous | Graphic Design | OCAD

Spread out your course class schedule.

 

Anonymous | Double Major in English and Sociology with an emphasis in Education |  Trent University

It’s okay to not have a concrete plan. I went in as a single major and now I am a double major with an emphasis. Your plans and ideas will change, and that’s ok, because that means you are finding your passion and focus in life.

Nick | Nuclear Engineering | UOIT

Some advice or information that I wish I had upon graduating high school would be how free university is. And how fast paced it is. Combining these two causes a lot of problems for people who aren’t used to being fully independent. Teachers in high school will chase you for your work but in university, the professors will automatically give you a zero even if you are 1 minute late handing in your assignment. I had to experience this the hard way. Combine this with how fast paced it is, and you will easily fall behind if you aren’t careful.

 

Giulia | Professional Communications | Ryerson University

The program you choose doesn’t mean that you’re defined by that specific field.

 

By Vimbai Chikoore

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